Orleans

In 2019, the city of New Orleans, weakened by the hurricane Rafael the previous year, was hit by Hurricane Barry in late July. Barry destroyed much of the infrastructure of New Orleans, and bills were introduced in Congress to attempt to what some senators saw as throwing money down a money pit. These bills failed, but in early October, hurricane Rebekah came roaring in and destroyed much of what Barry missed as well as the beginning of what had been rebuilt.

The government response following Rebekah was one of “if you want to live in New Orleans, great, but don’t expect the US to step in and fix it every time a hurricane comes through.” Additionally, the monies that the US supplied Louisiana to rebuild after Rebekah were funneled to establish a new community much like Alamy Falls in Colorado. This new city, Orleans, is located nearly 100 mile inland, and is connected to New Orleans by high-speed underground freight and passenger trains. Now New Orleans is a slum, inhabited by diehards and nae-do-wells, and the business that was once on New Orleans has moved to Orleans. The workers that New Orleans needs mostly come from Orleans, traveling by the bullet trains that connect the two cities.

Orleans

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